Session507
TitlePatristic Authority in the Early Middle Ages, I: Between Dissemination and Manipulation, c. 500-800
Date/TimeTuesday 5 July 2022: 09.00-10.30
 
OrganiserJesse Miika Johannes Keskiaho, Department of Philosophy, History & Art Studies, University of Helsinki
 
Moderator/ChairJesse Miika Johannes Keskiaho, Department of Philosophy, History & Art Studies, University of Helsinki
 
Paper 507-a Copying Augustine across Borders: The Manuscript Transmission of His Treatises on Initiation, Marriage, and Penance in the Early Middle Ages
(Language: English)
Matthieu Pignot, Department of History, Durham University
Index Terms: Ecclesiastical History; Language and Literature - Latin; Manuscripts and Palaeography; Religious Life
Paper 507-b Sermo castigatorius Sancti Augustini: Imagining (Pseudo-) Augustine in Early Medieval Collections
(Language: English)
Iris Denis, Radboud Institute for Culture & History (RICH), Radboud Universiteit Nijmegen
Index Terms: Language and Literature - Latin; Manuscripts and Palaeography; Sermons and Preaching
Paper 507-c From Caesarius of Arles to Alanus of Farfa: The Dynamic Reception of Patristic Preaching in 6th- and 7th-Century Sermon Collections
(Language: English)
Shari Boodts, Radboud Institute for Culture & History (RICH), Radboud Universiteit Nijmegen
Index Terms: Ecclesiastical History; Language and Literature - Latin; Manuscripts and Palaeography; Sermons and Preaching
 
AbstractThis session is the first of a diptych that analyses the medieval reception of patristic authority. The sessions combine a focus on the material aspects of textual transmission with attention to intellectual processes of reception. This approach emphasises the fluidity of traditional boundaries - between Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages, between history and philology, between authenticity and inauthenticity, between readers and authors. By highlighting processes of misattribution, manipulation, and reinterpretation, the papers demonstrate the dynamic and diverse nature of the medieval reception of the patristic heritage and challenge several still deeply ingrained notions surrounding the presence and impact of the Church Fathers in the medieval tradition.