Session1207
TitleThe Lost Latin Historiography of Late Antiquity
Date/TimeWednesday 6 July 2022: 14.15-15.45
 
SponsorPolish National Science Centre Project 'The Missing Link: The Lost Latin Historiography of the Later Roman Empire, 3rd-5th Centuries'
 
OrganiserAleksander Paradziński, Wydział Historii, Uniwersytet Warszawski
 
Moderator/ChairMarta Szada, Instytut Literaturoznawstwa, Uniwersytet Mikołaja Kopernika w Toruniu
 
Paper 1207-a A Mention of the Edictum Gallieni in Aurelius Victor and Its (Possible) Relationship with the Lost Historiography
(Language: English)
Álex Corona Encinas, Instituto Cultura y Sociedad, Universidad de Navarra
Index Terms: Historiography - Medieval; Language and Literature - Latin; Law; Politics and Diplomacy
Paper 1207-b Subverting the Kaisergeschichte: The Kings of Early Rome in the Historia Augusta
(Language: English)
Jeremy J. Swist, Department of Classical Studies, Brandeis University
Index Terms: Historiography - Medieval; Language and Literature - Latin
Paper 1207-c Theodosius and the Late Latin Historiography
(Language: English)
Aleksander Paradziński, Wydział Historii, Uniwersytet Warszawski
Index Terms: Historiography - Medieval; Language and Literature - Latin; Social History
 
AbstractThis session is concerned with the way the lost Latin history works of Late Antiquity were engaged by the preserved texts as well as socio-political contexts of their creation. In his paper A mention of the 'edictum Gallieni'... Álex Corona Encinas intends to examine some of the textual evidence and similitudes in the biographies of Gallienus written during the 4th century which could support the thesis of the common use of lost historiographical sources and the originality of Aurelius Victor. Jeremy Swist shall demonstrate in his paper 'Subverting the Kaisergeschichte' how Historia Augusta employs and manipulates the exempla relating to the Roman kings from the lost historiographic tradition. In the paper 'Theodosius and the Late Latin Historiography' Aleksander Paradziński is going to discuss the factors that conditioned a noticeable Latin historiographic activity in the late 80s and early 90s of the 4th century.