Session1611
TitleBridging Borders, II: Frames and Margins in Written Artefacts
Date/TimeThursday 7 July 2022: 11.15-12.45
 
SponsorCentre for the Study of Manuscript Cultures (CSMC) / Exzellenzcluster 'Understanding Written Artefacts', Universität Hamburg
 
OrganiserStefano Valente, Centre for the Study of Manuscript Cultures (CSMC), Exzellenzcluster 'Understanding Written Artefacts' / Institut für Griechische und Lateinische Philologie, Universität Hamburg
 
Moderator/ChairMalena Ratzke, Centre for the Study of Manuscript Cultures (CSMC), Exzellenzcluster 'Understanding Written Artefacts', Universität Hamburg
 
Paper 1611-a Stitching the Fish: On the Track of Damaged Marginalia on Oppian's Halieutica - The Case of Florence, Biblioteca Medicea Laurenziana MS Plut. 57.26
(Language: English)
Anne Krause, Institut für Griechische und Lateinische Philologie, Universität Hamburg
Index Terms: Byzantine Studies; Language and Literature - Greek; Manuscripts and Palaeography
Paper 1611-b What Borders Can Reveal about the Use of Psalter Manuscripts and the Limits of Their Usability
(Language: English)
Karin Becker, Centre for the Study of Manuscript Cultures (CSMC), Exzellenzcluster 'Understanding Written Artefacts', Universität Hamburg
Index Terms: Language and Literature - Latin; Liturgy; Manuscripts and Palaeography
Paper 1611-c 'Picturam quere fol. 4': Paratext and Hypertext in the Margins of a Late Medieval German Multi-Text Manuscript
(Language: English)
Hanna M. Wimmer, Centre for the Study of Manuscript Cultures (CSMC) / Kunstgeschichtliches Seminar, Universität Hamburg
Index Terms: Language and Literature - German; Language and Literature - Latin; Manuscripts and Palaeography; Teaching the Middle Ages
 
AbstractThe Cluster of Excellence 'Understanding Written Artefacts' follows a comparative approach to studying how the production of written artefacts has shaped human societies and cultures, and how these in turn have adapted written artefacts to their needs. This session focuses on margins and frames of medieval written artefacts. They represent not only the physical and conceptual borders of a core content, but also contribute to structuring and enriching it. Thus, they are essential for interpreting written artefacts by contemporary and later readers and viewers.