Session1122
TitleDemarcating Narratives: Old Icelandic Literature and the Construction of European Cultural and Political Identities
Date/TimeWednesday 6 July 2022: 11.15-12.45
 
OrganiserErmenegilda Rachel Müller, Faculty of Icelandic & Comparative Cultural Studies, University of Iceland, Reykjavík
 
Moderator/ChairEirik Westcoat, Independent Scholar, Pittsburgh
 
Paper 1122-a Monstrosity and Alterity: Distant Countries and Monsters in Medieval Icelandic and Continental Literature
(Language: English)
Caeli Athina Diaz Lluberes, Faculty of Icelandic & Comparative Cultural Studies, University of Iceland, Reykjavík
Index Terms: Language and Literature - Scandinavian; Manuscripts and Palaeography
Paper 1122-b Reception and Political Use of the Hrafnista Cycle in the Kalmar Union
(Language: English)
Jan Jürgensen, Faculty of Icelandic & Comparative Cultural Studies, University of Iceland, Reykjavík
Index Terms: Language and Literature - Scandinavian; Manuscripts and Palaeography; Medievalism and Antiquarianism
Paper 1122-c The Circulation of Saga Manuscripts at the Periphery of the Kalmar Union: Dissemination and Political Instrumentalisation of Old Icelandic Literature in the Early Modern Period
(Language: English)
Ermenegilda Rachel Müller, Faculty of Icelandic & Comparative Cultural Studies, University of Iceland, Reykjavík
Index Terms: Language and Literature - Scandinavian; Manuscripts and Palaeography
Paper 1122-d The Formation of a Männerbund: Late Reception of the Wild Hunt in Otto Höfler's Kultische Geheimbünde der Germanen
(Language: English)
Pablo Gomes de Miranda, Núcleo de Estudos Vikings e Escandinavos (NEVE), Universidade Federal Fluminense, Brasil
Index Terms: Historiography - Modern Scholarship; Language and Literature - Scandinavian; Medievalism and Antiquarianism
 
AbstractThis session covers key moments in the reception history of Old Icelandic literature where it became central in discourses about identities with political implications - looking at the texts, their dissemination, and their interpretation. The four papers explore: -a) How the literature itself construes identity and alterity; -b) How the Kalmar union used and instrumentalised that literature to build its identity and legitimise its power, and -c) How the politics of the union influenced the manuscript dissemination of the literature; -d) The recuperation of the texts in the construction of identitarian discourses outside of the Nordic countries by exploring their use in Third Reich ideology.