Session614
TitleRemembering the Ends of the World: The Geography of Memory, Monsters, and the Apocalypse
Date/TimeTuesday 5 July 2022: 11.15-12.45
 
OrganiserMargaret W. Cotter-Lynch, Department of English, Humanities & Languages, Southeastern Oklahoma State University
 
Moderator/ChairDanielle Joyner, Department of Art History, Lawrence University, Wisconsin
 
Paper 614-a 'Armed with tears and prayers': Clare of Assisi in the Franciscan Apocalypse
(Language: English)
Hannah Jones, Department of History, Binghamton University
Index Terms: Gender Studies; Hagiography; Manuscripts and Palaeography; Sermons and Preaching
Paper 614-b Monsters, Demons, and Mary of Egypt: Sanctity at the End of the World in Caxton's Golden Legend
(Language: English)
Margaret W. Cotter-Lynch, Department of English, Humanities & Languages, Southeastern Oklahoma State University
Index Terms: Gender Studies; Hagiography; Language and Literature - Latin; Language and Literature - Middle English
Paper 614-c Memories of the Medieval: The Curiosities of Edward Barlow's Maritime World
(Language: English)
Alistair Maeer, Department of History, Texas Wesleyan University
Index Terms: Manuscripts and Palaeography; Maritime and Naval Studies; Social History
 
AbstractThe end of the world was envisioned as a border between now and eternity, the human and the supernatural. Apocalyptic expectations were mapped onto familiar landscapes which would become the gateways for monstrous forces to disrupt the world's natural order. Whether at the edges of the Holy Land, the battlefront against heresy in Italy, or the limits of the mapped world, the temporal and geographic ends of the world overlapped and expanded our understanding of this world and the next. This panel explores apocalyptic geographies as liminal epistemological spaces, where the unknowable could be imagined, encountered, and described.