Session814
TitleCrossing Borders and More
Date/TimeTuesday 5 July 2022: 16.30-18.00
 
SponsorInternational Center of Medieval Art (ICMA)
 
OrganiserFrancesco Capitummino, Department of History of Art / Sidney Sussex College, University of Cambridge
Ziqiao Wang, Courtauld Institute of Art, University of London
 
Moderator/ChairFrancesco Capitummino, Department of History of Art / Sidney Sussex College, University of Cambridge
 
Paper 814-a Liminal Spaces in the World of Medieval Merchants
(Language: English)
Nicola Carotenuto, Faculty of History, University of Oxford
Index Terms: Archaeology - Sites; Art History - General
Paper 814-b The Perception of the Space beyond the Threshold in the Mosaics of the Basilica of Sant'Apollinare Nuovo in Ravenna
(Language: English)
Marco Innocenti, Facoltà di Lettere e Filosofia, Università Cattolica di Milano
Index Terms: Art History - General; Byzantine Studies
Paper 814-c Spatio-Temporal Liminality and Transcendence in Trecento and Early Quattrocento Last Judgment Scenes
(Language: English)
Olga Todorović, Department of History of Art, University of Belgrade
Index Terms: Art History - General; Language and Literature - Middle English
Paper 814-d (In)Human Architectures in Geoffrey Chaucer's Troilus and Criseyde
(Language: English)
Amy Danielle Juarez, Department of English Literature, University of California, Riverside
Index Terms: Art History - General; Language and Literature - Middle English
 
AbstractBorders in the medieval world could encompass a range of delimitations. Geographical borders on maps proclaim demarcations between states or continents, while social borders distinguish different communities of people often through dress or customs. Ideological borders, such as those between religious belief and taboos, instruct individuals to recognise what is morally accepted by divine and clerical authorities and what is not. We aim to organize a session around the visual or material culture produced for or involved in the particular experience of crossing thresholds around the medieval world. How did images, objects, and monumental structures contribute to the experience of crossing the border? How did this particular movement speak to broader concepts of faith, identity, and morality? What do objects exchanged from different geographical zones in history reveal about pre-modern globalization?

We invite papers on a range of topics, which may include but are not limited to:
- The visual design of different thresholds with spiritual implications of passage;
- Façades and their portals and doorways, or gateways and other liminal sites intended as transition or initiation spaces;
- Sacred spaces and their representations